Intel’s 10-core i9-7900X Final Specs Leaked: 4.0GHz Base, 4.5GHz Boost Clocks

Intel Core i9-7900X specs

New details on Intel’s 10-core Skylake X CPU, the i9-7900X, have surfaced and it looks like the chip could be more powerful than anyone expected.

Ukrainian tech site Overclockers.ua (via TPU) spotted the Core i9-7900X in a SiSoft Sandra benchmarking database. The chip appears to be mistakenly labeled as an i7 part, which is possible because of the lack of official support for the Core i9 branding.

The Core i9-7900X final specs kind of deviate from what we saw in a previous leak which pegged the chip at as featuring clock speeds of 3.30GHz base and 4.30GHz Turbo Boost. But, it seems that the CPU will leverage much higher stock speeds.

According to the SiSoft report, Intel’s 10-core Skylake X will be clocked at 4.0GHz base and 4.5GHz Turbo Boost. These are extremely high clock speeds than you would expect from a 10-core part.

Intel Core i9-7900X specs - SiSoft Sandra benchmark

Considering the chip was expected to run at far lower clock speeds, some have speculated this could be a revision on Intel’s behalf to counter the potential threat from AMD’s Ryzen HEDT platform.

DON’T MISS: Intel suggests users stop Overclocking Core i7 7700K to avoid temp spikes

The competition between Intel and AMD has been raging this year since the launch of Ryzen. Intel Skylake X will compete directly with AMD’s Threadripper lineup featuring up to 16 cores.

AMD’s HEDT platform, code named Whitehaven, includes support for quad-channel DDR4 memory and up to 44 PCIe lanes. Whitehaven not only offers more cores compared to Skylake X, but more I/O, storage, and L3 Cache as well.

Coupled with the value proposition offered by AMD’s Zen architecture, Threadripper seems to have an edge over the Skylake X. This should mean if Intel is to hold its performance crown, it will have to do more than offering high clock speeds; that is to launch its Core i9 Skylake X with a price cut for maximum effect.

Apart from clock speeds, another juicy bit of information revealed by the SiSoft leak is the motherboard that was used. You can see the board supporting i9-7900X is, as-of-yet-unknown, X299 Gigabyte AORUS Gaming 7. Of course, X299 is the next-gen Intel chipset that will support forthcoming Core i9 series processors and platform features.

Other Core i9-7900X specs confirmed by this listing include 10MB of level two cache with 1MB for each core, and a TDP rating of 175W. The chip will also support 44 PCIe Gen 3.0 lanes.

  • ASIM SIDDIQ

    Looking forward to it.

  • cat1092

    “According to the SiSoft report, Intel’s 10-core Skylake X will be clocked at 4.0GHz base and 4.5GHz Turbo Boost. These are extremely high clock speeds than you would expect from a 10-core part.”

    This is bull crap that truly stinks. how can Intel call these ‘extremely high clock speeds’, the i7-4790K of a few gens back & still sought after today, runs at a base of 4.0Ghz & 4.4GHz Turbo, what I’d call the same would be 5.0GHz with 6.0-6.5Ghz Turbo out of the box for the ‘i9-7900X’.

    One would rightfully expect more GHz out of this CPU w/out having to resort to overclocking, quite frankly am disappointed that Intel didn’t best the i7-4790K & others with the same GHz level. What is there to not understand, with such a CPU at what will be a staggering price, that 5.0GHz isn’t unreasonable to attain with extra for Turbo. Actually more for the latter, many 1st gen (2011) i7 2.4Ghz chips can boost up to just over 3.4GHz (over 1GHz), so even more native boost is to be expected from such a ‘powerful’ CPU. Is Intel still afraid to release a 5.0GHz chip?

    The sad news is that few, if any games, can benefit from 10 cores, although there’s certainly other uses for these, will make excellent CPU’s for those who writes code, Workstation use where there’s several VM’s in use, those who uses Photoshop/other apps that’s hungry for more cores, as well as medical use, and last but not least, crunching numbers & those who folds proteins (projects such as [email protected] & similar). Daily desktop drivers won’t have the need for these, quad core models will still get the job done for years, if not a couple of decades, to come.

    Cat

  • Diky Galau

    Sadly, threadripper slay this newborn Baby