Seven Vega 10 Device IDs listed in latest Linux patch, Polaris 12 IDs also leaked

AMD Vega 10 GPU Lineup confirmed

It seems that AMD’s Vega is in its final phase of development, as the company issues a Linux patch for the next-gen GPU. 100 or so patches were released yesterday which include the first list of Vega 10 device IDs, as well as the device IDs of Polaris 12 GPU which is expected to power the RX 550.

The latest Linux patches amount to over 40 thousand lines of code. These will be used as basis for adding Vega support to AMDGPU which is obviously a big task due to shedload of changes over previous GPU architectures.

Read More: AMD Radeon Vega Graphics Card Pictured In All Its Glory

We know from the internal nomenclature that the codename of Radeon RX Vega GPU is GFX9. In this case, the device ID is 687f which is indeed the full Vega 10 chip. There are 6 other variants in addition to this, making a total of seven Vega 10 device IDs.

Vega 10 Device IDs:

{0x1002, 0x6860, PCI_ANY_ID, PCI_ANY_ID, 0, 0, CHIP_VEGA10},
{0x1002, 0x6861, PCI_ANY_ID, PCI_ANY_ID, 0, 0, CHIP_VEGA10},
{0x1002, 0x6862, PCI_ANY_ID, PCI_ANY_ID, 0, 0, CHIP_VEGA10},
{0x1002, 0x6863, PCI_ANY_ID, PCI_ANY_ID, 0, 0, CHIP_VEGA10},
{0x1002, 0x6867, PCI_ANY_ID, PCI_ANY_ID, 0, 0, CHIP_VEGA10},
{0x1002, 0x686c, PCI_ANY_ID, PCI_ANY_ID, 0, 0, CHIP_VEGA10},
{0x1002, 0x687f, PCI_ANY_ID, PCI_ANY_ID, 0, 0, CHIP_VEGA10},

Built using the latest 14nm process noode, the Vega 10 will span a die size of over 500mm2, featuring two HBM2 stacks, with up to 16 GB of memory. It will sport 64 Compute Engines which should translate to exactly 4096 stream processors.

Vega 10 device IDs via Linux patch
AMD Vega 10 GPU featuring two HBM2 stacks

In terms of performance, Vega 10 GPU is set to rival Nvidia’s GeForce GTX 1080 as well as the newly-released GTX 1080 Ti. We’ve already seen the GPU in action, beating the GTX 1080 by 10% whilst running on ordinary 300 series Fury drivers.

You can learn about the specs and features of the Vega architecture in this post.

Now, let’s move to Polaris 12 device IDs. The 699F GPU in the list is assumed to be the full chip while others are simply cut down variants.

Polaris 12 Device IDs:

{0x1002, 0x6980, PCI_ANY_ID, PCI_ANY_ID, 0, 0, CHIP_POLARIS12},
{0x1002, 0x6981, PCI_ANY_ID, PCI_ANY_ID, 0, 0, CHIP_POLARIS12},
{0x1002, 0x6985, PCI_ANY_ID, PCI_ANY_ID, 0, 0, CHIP_POLARIS12},
{0x1002, 0x6986, PCI_ANY_ID, PCI_ANY_ID, 0, 0, CHIP_POLARIS12},
{0x1002, 0x6987, PCI_ANY_ID, PCI_ANY_ID, 0, 0, CHIP_POLARIS12},
{0x1002, 0x6995, PCI_ANY_ID, PCI_ANY_ID, 0, 0, CHIP_POLARIS12},
{0x1002, 0x699F, PCI_ANY_ID, PCI_ANY_ID, 0, 0, CHIP_POLARIS12},

Polaris 12 would be the smallest-ever Polaris chip. The GPU essentially packs half as many shaders as Polaris 11 does, and might end up inside the Radeon RX 550, the entry-level graphics card in the upcoming RX 500 series. The card would sell below the RX 460’s $99, and still play eSports titles such as League of Legends and DOTA 2.